1st Responders CPR/First Aid certification training course hosted by The Kurt Caselli Foundation, Fox Racing and Babes in the Dirt

babes in the dirt

We are proud to announce that we will be partnering with The Kurt Caselli Foundation and Fox Racing to host a ladies only CPR/ First Aid training course. There are only 30 spots open so please join us and register now!

REGISTER NOW by clicking here! 

This will be The Kurt Caselli Foundation’s 3rd open registration for a First Aid/CPR certification and training course in conjunction with Babes In the Dirt.   The KCF first introduced this new Foundation safety initiative in 2017 when we took the top off-road riders in the U.S and offered this course to help bring awareness to things they could use on and off the trail.  Their goal know is to offer these courses a couple times per year to the community with instruction of  Life Goes On (certified licensed teaching company).   We are honored to partner with The Kurt Caselli foundation to offer this class for ladies who want to get certified! You can reserve your spot today with a $25 donation at (link )  100% of your donation will go directly to the KCF and help fund future safety initiatives and Riders 1st Responders CPR courses. The KCF will be funding the majority of the cost for each participant as the CPR/First Aid certification and lunch is a $175 value — saving you $150, you don’t want to miss this opportunity!
 
The Kurt Caselli Foundation’s mission is Protecting and Supporting the Lives of Off-Road Riders. The Foundation has budgeted allocations and planned safety projects for 2019 and years beyond, setting this year’s safety budget to $120,000 to host and support safety events and fund educational scholarships for riders.
 
 “Our group at The Kurt Caselli Foundation continues to strive to serve our community the best we can and to promote safety. The Kurt Caselli  Riders 1st Responders is the latest initiative that will be providing courses in CPR/First Aid certification and training for participants in off-road racing. We rolled this out December 2017 with huge success and teaming up with the Babes In The Dirt is a great fit for our Safety Foundation.” — Donny Emler Jr, President of the Kurt Caselli Foundation
 

Adrienne Hunt and Her New Husqvarna FE 250

Meet Adrienne Hunt @SLOdirtgirl ! After ripping the demo bikes at Babes in the Dirt she decided to get herself a brand new Husqvarna FE 250. We got to catch up with her to hear more about her life on two wheels and why calls the FE 250 her dream bike.

babes in the dirt

What is your name?

Adrienne Hunt @SLOdirtgirl

What do you do for a living? Tell us about your job.

I work in animal welfare and am a veterinary assistant. My job duties range from day to day from assisting in animal welfare investigations, humane education to helping an injured pet in a hospital setting. I recently spent 22 days assisting up at the CampFire near Paradise, California and that was the most heart-warming and heart-wrenching experience of my life. The time, energy and love so many people put in, to make sure these animals were cared for at the front lines and behind the scenes, really reaffirmed that humans can “Be the person your dog thinks you are.”

Where are you from?

Born and raised in San Luis Obispo, California (SLO)

Where do you live?

Still walking the mean streets of “Bubble Gum Alley” (SLO)

 When were you first introduced to riding dirt? Who introduced you?

I started riding mountain bikes in 2012 after losing a bunch of weight, as I needed something to keep me busy after I gave up all the glory and retired from couch surfing. I really got into riding and I did a few downhill and XC races for fun but then started to get involved in other hobbies, so riding took a back seat for several years.

I started missing the adrenaline and physicality of it, but I also had an aversion to big climbs, enter the dirt bike. My fiancé had been riding dirt bikes since we met but it was only until June of 2017 that I was like, it’s time for me to check this out and get up these hills by a twist of the throttle.

How long have you been riding?

I’ve been riding and falling in the dirt for about 1 ½ years now.

I thought that after riding mountain bikes that dirt biking would come naturally for me, it did not, and I learned humility quickly. I had many crashes and made many mistakes when I first started riding but stuck it out, despite a few trail side meltdowns, some tears of frustration and even a few self-deprecating comments here and there, I’ve learned to stick it out and could not be happier with my progression however fast or slow it comes now.

babes in the dirt

Why do you like riding dirt?

So hard to narrow it down, riding through whoop-de-doos or pulling a wheelie, yeah! (Song: Dirt Bike rider)

As you can tell I am super serious person but truly, my favorite part is the progression. I enjoy seeing myself progress and get so pumped when I see other riders and their progression. It is one of the many things that I love about it. Seeing a trail or a section that you said “nope” to and then being able to take it on or seeing your buddy do the same. So cool!

I have made so many new friends and people I consider “family” while riding, I could not be more grateful. I like to throw together impromptu, all inclusive (male/female/squirrel) group rides or little campouts every now and then. I find that this is a great way to have people get together who may not have otherwise met up. It is so fun to see a rider meet another rider who is close to them and see them get all stoked to have someone to ride with near them.

I truly have a good time whenever I am in the dirt so whether it is “going all out” for me or helping newer riders, I love it all.

Run us through the list of bikes you have had?

In 2008 I bought a 1986 Honda Nighthawk 750 and within a few weeks, hit sand in an apex, laid it down and was hospitalized for a few weeks. My family wanted me to take a break from riding, so I respected that. In 2016, things changed and I was able to purchase a Kawasaki Versys with the intent to ADV it out and do some Dual-sport rides. After some fun adventures and mishaps I decided that I wanted something a little more dirt worthy, so I sold the Versys and bought my first dirt bike in May of 2017 which was my 1993 XR250r.  

babes in the dirt

What do you ride now?

We just bought my dream bike, a 2018 Husqvarna FE250 and I could not be more excited for the adventures to come. My first ride on her was just this Christmas at Hungry Valley OHV. We had set up one of those impromptu campouts and I was stoked to get on that maiden dirt voyage. As I confidently threw my leg over my new steed, I put her in first, let out the clutch and promptly stalled it and did a slow-motion fall to the ground.

As we set out on the group ride I knew that I felt very uncomfortable on the bike and I felt I was going to hurt myself if I tried to keep up but didn’t know the bike yet, so I broke off from the group for a few hours and just did my own thing. No pressure, no audience, just me, my bike and my own thoughts. After that I was able to ride with more confidence and a lot less of a death grip.

If you could have 2 bikes what would your other bike be?

2019 Husqvarna 701. We would love to be able to travel more by two wheels and check off some bucket list items. Having something a bit more street orientated with some off-road capabilities would help get some of that list knocked out.

Tell us what you love about the bike you ride now? Why did you choose that bike?

I was able to log some solid hours on the FE250 at Babes in the dirt last year. I think you could equate it to a groupie who just lingers near the bands dressing room, that was me at the Husqvarna demo booth (Hi Allison, it’s USAdrienne!) After taking it out for several rides, I was hooked. The throttle response, the suspension, right out of the gate it felt like a bike that met my current skill level but would also allow me to level up. The best part is it rides like a track bike but is plated for the times I do hit a dual sport ride or need to get from trail to trail.

It also comes down to how I was treated by Husqvarna and how they support riders especially us women. I was treated like I was family from the moment I skipped up the husky booth with childlike glee. They were great with the barrage of questions I had for them and when they had demos going out but had a bike that was not getting ridden, they allowed me to join the demo ride again.

Where did you buy your bike from? How was your experience at the dealership?

We live at least 3 hours from the closest dealer, so I had to call several places to get quotes and talk about what I needed as a rider and what I was willing to spend. Honestly, I was a bit disappointed with a few of the shops I reached out to as there was a lack of willingness to help someone who had to drive to see their product. I get cash in hand talks, but I was talked down to by some dealers or they would not deal with me over the phone at all. I was able to speak with Victor from HYR in Redlands and they were amazing to work with and gave me a great deal on the moto. For us, pulling the trailer, it was over a 5hr drive but it was worth the drive knowing I was being taken care of and my money was going to a shop that seemed to treat everyone with respect.  

babes in the dirt

What kind of terrain do you like riding the best?

Isn't any terrain the best terrain on a dirt bike?! To narrow it down, I really enjoy technical terrain, however you categorize that. It could be the single track that is sloughing away to a steep drop and you keep telling yourself “keep your eyes ahead...” The chunky rock section that has you working that clutch and picking your lines just so, or the steep, rutted, loose hill climb that has you sitting at the bottom of it for a few seconds, trying to pump yourself up for what is to come. I like any terrain that challenges me and helps me progress.  

What kind of terrain is a challenge for you but you want to master?

I thoroughly enjoy but am not great at rocky enduro type terrain. I find keeping the momentum through the chunk can be difficult or I’ll get in my own head and start to think too much about a rock coming up in my path and grab a fist of brake. At the same time, I love the feeling of being in control yet on the verge of being bucked off. Lots of clutch control to work on for me but again, that is why I love the braap so much, you generally can grow as a rider, as much as you are willing to push yourself.

What is the most challenging riding experience you have had?

A month or two into first starting to ride, I was all about enduro. @Crystal_loves_moto this, @Megs_braap that. I was determined to Jarvis off and do my own thing one day, so the fiancé and I went to Ballinger Canyon and I was just going to “explore” and putt-putt around for a “chill ride.” So we went our separate ways and I went to explore this little area I had eyed before that had a dry little creek bed next to it. As I explored, I thought in all my wisdom, what a great place to practice these enduro skills that I have mastered in all my two months of riding and watching videos.

I rode to the creek bed thinking I’ll drop in there and play around these rocks, it is narrow but passable. It is about a 4ft drop into the bed and as I started to drop in, I got a better visual of where I thought I could exit out of and realized, it was impassable and... the front wheel goes down. I looked back up to where I came from and there was no way I was getting it back up, so I had to forge on. With the bike being flooded and the kickstand sinking in when I tried to kick it over, I struggled for over an hour to get the bike to start in the mid-day August heat. It ended up being so sandy and deep that I dug my wheel in many times. With getting stuck several times and stalling the bike, the 1 hour or so adventure turned into a 3-hour knock-down, drag out fight with the terrain and my bike. When I got back to camp the fiancé asked how many miles I got in and I think I pulled a whopping 0.75 miles that day but many lessons learned. 

babes in the dirt

Where are some of your favorite places to ride?

Hollister Hills OHV  ranks pretty high on the list for several reasons. It combines two of my favorite things camping and dirt bikes. The park really offers a new rider a variety of terrain in a more controlled setting and for me that was really helpful to focus on my riding more than worrying about traffic coming at me at times, as Hollister has many one-way trails. One of my favorite areas there is the enduro course and the trials course. From my first visit there I eyed this big tire in the enduro course and a log drop at the trials course. I kept telling myself you are going to hit those one day and with knees shaking and heart punding, one visit I mustered the mental strength to do it. The first attempt on the tire, not bad, I made it, hit the throttle a bit too much at the top and front wheel lifted a bit, it made the landing a bit sketchy but I pulled it off. I thought, lets’ do it again, get better at it! I approached it and just as I was about to go over my brain went weird, I got scared and I just rolled off the throttle and stalled at the top and toppled over. Bike upside down, oil dripping down the frame, there was only one thing to do, take a picture. There are a few goal trails there as well that I want to ride now that I have the Husky like Troll trail but the poison oak factor makes me wonder how worth it the trail is, when I get exposed to that evil leaf, it is no joke. 

I also fell in love with Kennedy Meadows my one time there. I wish I could build a little homestead and live there fulltime. The place for me, has been the best overall riding and camping experience for me, it is just so gorgeous. The trees and meadows, the creeks, the wildlife; Kennedy Meadows just meets every expectation for me when it comes to combining my love of nature, camping and dirt bike riding. The trails vary quite a bit but unless you are an adventurous beginner, it has some fairly technical terrain. I was really able to surprise myself there and made it through many spots that myself and others were standing by waiting for the topple. I really look forward to getting back out there in 2019.

What is on your moto bucket list to ride?

Big Bear, Forest Hill Trail 6, B.C area, Moab, Sawtooth mountains, Tillamook area, race the Donner Hare scramble and many more.

Do you ride with a lot of other female riders?

I have a really solid set of ladies that I have a great time riding with, they live 3-4hours away from me but we seem to find the time to meet up and ride together every few months or so. It goes back to how supportive it can be riding with other women and the growth and bonding you all develop over it. I am able to be a small part of a bigger picture in many ways as a female rider and I really enjoy trying to foster those relationships with other female riders. I enjoy going fast and getting out of my comfort zone but at 36, I have nothing to prove, other than something to myself. With that being said, I really enjoy riding with new riders whether leading or sweeping with a group or just going out to have a good time. I like to see how they learn and if I am lucky to ride with them down the road, to see how much they have progressed. I think some of us ladies, and I am guilty of it, get in our own heads and think we are holding up a group or you don't want to be the “liability person,” You're not, ride your own ride, progress at your own pace.

The bummer thing is I don’t really have anyone that I ride with locally, it would be really nice to rip around with some ladies but they are few and far between, if you know of any that want to ride, send them my way!  

Do you have anyone in the moto world that you look up to?

I look up to so many riders for many different reasons and wish I could list them all but certainly my friend Avila (@avy119). I met her and her husband at one of the random rides we threw together at Hungry Valley. She is a blast to ride with, is willing to try any trail and gets through it with a smile.

My friend CJ (@radical_budhist) also comes to mind. She is someone who I have had the pleasure of watching progress so much since we first started riding together. She was another gal I met through one of those impromptu campouts up at Hollister Hills when we both were pros on fire roads. She is always in a rad mood, keeping the group smiling and willing to push her comfort zone. We all share so many “woohoos!” on our rides.

I look up to all the ladies of the dirt world who are making it happen; @Babesinthedirt and all you have put into this, it has changed my life as rider. Babes has exposed me to opportunities and people I may have never met otherwise. The @dirt_ladies group and what we are trying to do with getting more women riding together and being able to connect with one another.

Last but not least, my fiancé. He has been my number one fan from day one. Always supportive of my riding. Has helped celebrate triumphs, listened to my frustrations and always makes sure that the bike keeps running so we could do it all over again. There is no one I would rather have as my road dog in life. 

What was your experience at Babes in the Dirt/Babes Ride Out events?

One of the best experiences of my life thus far! 2018 was my first year at Babes in the Dirt and

I rolled in early Friday and helped volunteer for the morning until my afternoon Husqvarna demo. I was so excited to try a new bike but super nervous as well. The demo was well paced, everyone had everyone's back and the Husqvarna crew made sure that you were taken care of and had a good time. I was able to meet many of the gals I follow on Instagram and that was so neat to put faces to the names and even ride with a few. That night I made my rounds to the many trailers, tents and car campers that I wanted to say hi to. It felt like there was not enough time in this day, I wanted it to go on but sleep was needed so I reluctantly wandered back to camp for some Zzz’s.

Saturday had lots of opportunities, and it was hard to choose which to do; a Husqvarna demo, ride trail or track in the park with friends, play games at the various booths, check out the cool gear at the Fox Women’s booth or just get to know these ladies who you may only get to see once a year. Some of the dirt ladies set up a small beginner’s ride for a few ladies and we had a great time watching these gals really come out of their comfort zone and own the trails. I think that is one of the biggest things I think a lot of ladies can get out of female only events, you get a different support system, you learn that you are doing okay and that many other ladies are in the same boat. You meet ladies that are rippers but just want to support another rider and are just stoked to see you out on the trail. You also meet newer riders and you bond over the same triumphs and experiences.

Saturday night consisted of merriment and karaoke. I may or may not have had a great time embarrassing myself while singing Macklemore’s “Thrift shop” while coming down with a  cold. 

Sunday was time to say our “See you next years.” We shook the weekends sand off and helped each other load up and prepare for our various distances home. Before leaving I was able to take Brian Garrahan’s group training that afternoon and he made that was such a fun experience. I went into the class thinking I knew a fair amount of the basics for riding but found many techniques that could improve my riding or ways to refine what I was already doing but make it safer and in turn, riding into more fun.

What advice do you have for someone thinking about getting in to riding dirt?

Just be you. We all get into riding dirt for different reasons and throughout your whole moto journey you will be exposed to different types of riders and types of riding but as long as you are true to the reason you ride, the ride will always be fun and always be yours.

It is easy to get into your own head, to think maybe you are not improving enough or when you are riding with people that you are the one, “keeping them back,” you are not. It may not happen overnight but you will find your “people.” The ones you look up to and the ones that look up to you. The ones that keep pushing you to do more because they know you can and the ones that will help push your bike back up the hill when maybe it did not all go to plan. Riding is an adventure and all adventures have ups and downs, just remember, you are doing this for you and no one else, when that is the motivation that is when it really becomes fun.

Anything else you would like to add?

A big thanks to all the ladies and men behind the scenes who are supportive in getting more women riding and having fun in the dirt. Instagram groups like @Dualsportwomen , @WLFenduro, @National_Forest_Riders (NFR) and @Corva are all doing things to help support all riders and our riding community. Husqvarna motorcycles are at the forefront of highlighting this movement of women riders and putting their money where their mouth is.

Fox Womens with their support and proactiveness with their female riding audience’s needs and wants as riders.

And of course, to ALL who have supported me through this journey of mine. It has been such a fun and wild ride since I started riding a year and some change ago. When I joined Instagram, I wanted to try and find more women to ride with and to highlight the struggles and triumphs of someone my age, who just started getting into riding a dirt bike. I have made so many friends and have been able to follow along with so many adventures of others. I look forward to many more years making a fool….er…improving my skills as a rider and look forward to enjoying that journey with others as well. Cheers to #2019yearofthebraap.

.

 

Babes in the Dirt 5 | Ticket Sales are L-I-V-E

Babes in the Dirt 5 ticket sales are L I V E ! We have rented the entire Quail Canyon MX Park and group site April 26th-28th for a ladies only weekend of off road fun! You must be pre-registered to attend and tickets are non refundable.

Who it's for:

This is a ladies only dirt bike & ATV campout for those who want to explore dirt and learn riding fundamentals. We cater to ladies new to dirt to advanced so come with the mindset to be challenged but most importantly, to have FUN!

The Basics

This weekend is about off-roading, camping, and good times with friends so high five your neighbor, they could easily become your new BFF.  Rain or shine, gates to the group site will open at 10:00 AM sharp on Friday April 26th. The group site has limited space and there is no assigned camping spots. If you buy a ticket, you will have a space but under no circumstances is "saving spots" allowed once you arrive. If you wan to be next to your bud, arrive together.

What ticket do I need? Explain them! What do they get me?

No problemo! 

General Admission 

  • 2 nights of camping 

  • A small "thank you" gift consisting of a sticker for your ride, button and key chain

  • Flushing toilets and a place to brush your teeth (did we mentioned they are cleaned and stocked around the clock?)

  • Entertainment 

  • Games

  • Full access to private MX track groomed daily

  • Full access to private GP track

  • Access to entire park from our site

  • Access to sign up for free Husqvarna demos / learn to moto classes (TBD on sign ups and they are limited)

  • Fun giveaways from our sponsors

  • Free clinics (TBD on time slots) 

  • Overnight security 

  • Our gratitude for helping us make this event possible, we seriously couldn't do it without you! 

Vehicle Parking Pass

  • Admits any (1) vehicle or vehicle + trailer into the space that is under 30ft or less in its entire length. 

  • Every passenger + driver must have a general admission ticket to enter.

Vehicle Parking Pass 30ft + 

  • Admits (1) vehicle into the space that is 30+ ft or more in its entire length.

  • Every passenger + driver must have a general admission ticket to enter. make sure to scroll down to see what will be on site and what won't be.  

Don’t have a dirt bike but want to learn? No problem! We recommend renting a bike from Gorman Motorsport Rentals!  Ask for Glory 805-620-2620. They are ONLY open on weekends so please be patient as they are family owned and you ladies always bring in a surge of calls. Let them know your with our event at Quail Canyon MX Park. 

*We will have Husqvarna on site with a limited # of demo bikes (please stay tuned for more information on how to get on the list to give one a spin as that sign up launches closer to the date of the event). These bikes will be on rotation so if you want to ride all day, please rent from a trusted rental agency so you are guaranteed to have your own bike. 

FAQs:

Please note, these are just a few FAQs that are dirt specific. To know all FAQ for all BRO events click HERE

Are there ID or minimum age requirements to enter the event? All our events are 21+ and ladies only.  IDs will be checked before you enter the site so make sure it matches the name you register with. Everyone MUST be pre registered to attend. 

Why are you charging this year? We have been so stoked to foot the bill the past 4 years but as the event grows, so do the many costs to be able to produce it. The ticket fee and parking for trailers, toyhaulers, and RVS go to cover the many line items that go into producing an event of this magnitude to ensure it can continue to exist. Thank you for helping <3!

What kind of transportation is allowed?  Cars, trucks, trailers, toy haulers, and RVs are welcome inside the campsite but parking is limited due to space. There is a parking fee for anything behind towed behind a car or truck as you'd be taking up much more space which reduces the # of attendee space. Looking for a ride? Hit up our event page on Facebook to see if you can hop in with another attendee. 

What sticker does my bike need? Does my bike need a spark arrestor? Red or green and YES you will get ticketed if you do not have a spark arrestor. Please read all the rules and regs for your offroad vehicle by clicking this link 

Can I bring my pet into the event? No animals can be in the group site unless they are service dogs. This is not a pet friendly environment. 

How will I know when the Husqvarna registration,  classes, etc are open for registration? If you are registered to attend, you will get an email announcing it. If you aren't paying attention, you may miss it! We do not have a date for when the email will go out (please don't ask <3). 

Can I get a refund? Tickets are non refundable but you can transfer up until registration ends. 

How do I contact the park for additional information about the trails, weather, terrain, longitude and latitude, wind speed, composition report of the dirt substance?!

  • Public Information Inquiries: (916) 324-4442

  • Email: ohvinfo.ohv@parks.ca.gov 

  • Website: OHV Parks CA GOV

  • Link to view our campsite: Click HERE 

Are there medics on site? Every ranger is trained as a first responder. We have hired a private ambulance staffed with two EMTs for track hours only. The closest hospital is 20-30 min away and the site is set up for air vac. Please contact the park with any questions or concerns. All riders will ride at their own risk (916) 324-4442. 

What should I bring into the event?

  • Protective boots, helmet, goggles, and any motocross gear you own! You can also rent gear at Gorman Powersports. Trust us, this is important because you will "eat it" at some point during the day. Fox will be on site with some extra boots and helmets but there won't be enough for everyone so plan accordingly. 

  • WATER! Make sure to bring plenty of water as the site does not have it. One gallon per person per day is recommended. 

  • Camping gear if you plan on staying the night (sleeping bag, headlamp, tent etc). It is SUPER dark! 

  • A few trash bags! Please clean up after yourselves. We must leave site spotless if we want to be welcomed back. 

  • Warm clothes

  • Snacks! (always). There are no grills or structures for outdoor cooking on the property. Please use the food truck or bring your own propane grill. Charcoal is prohibited. 

  • Drinks (the fun kind to enjoy when the bikes are shut down for the night).

  • Cash for the coffee drinks, food trucks, and Babes in the Dirt merch!  (cards are not accepted) 

  • Battery pack to charge phone. We do have power but it is allocated to lighting the event, not charging phones :) Reception is terrible too. 

  • Extra toilet paper (2 ply.... you won't regret this)

  • Extra gas for your moto 

What can't I bring into the event?

  • Kids. This event is 21+

  • Dogs :( 

  • Easy Ups (sorry, far far too windy)

  • Marketing materials (flyers, stickers, banners etc unless you are sponsoring)

  • Your boyfriend / husband (he will have to find his own trails to rip this weekend)

What amenities will be on site? 

  • A food truck with food for purchase (CASH ONLY)

  • A coffee truck with drinks for purchase (CASH ONLY)

  • Flushing toilets and running water (not drinkable)

  • Indoor pavilion w/ lighting and warmth 

  • Fire pits for bonfires. We do recommend you use the food truck as the weather is crazy windy at night and I for one have burned my food 3 years in a row. 

  • Please remember there is no power at the site..like 0 for attendees to power items 

  • Nightly entertainment

  • Games 

A detailed schedule will be released via email to those who have registered to attend the event closer to the event date. Info for group rides, learning demos, Husky demos, rules regs, on site fun stuff, food truck, coffee menu etc will roll out between now and April so please stay tuned to the blog and your email after you register <3

Art by Desirae @desirae201

Want to connect to like minded ladies now? We have the official event pages set up on our Facebook. Simply click below and check the “going” box.

READY TO REGISTER? CLICK BELOW!

Babes in the Dirt East September 20-22nd | Greeneville Tennessee at i81 Motorsports Park

Introducing Babes in the Dirt East taking place Sept 20-22nd 2019 in beautiful Greeneville, Tennessee at I-81 Motorsports Park and will include tons of open track and trail riding as well as sign ups for training courses in flat track, moto X and enduro cross. You will not want to miss this one. Tickets and all info launch April 29th.

Want to connect to like minded ladies now? We have the official event pages set up on our Facebook. Simply click below and check the “going” box.

BABES IN THE DIRT

Failing, It's Going to Happen | A Guide to Staying Mindful & Managing Expectations When Learning to Ride Dirt

Discouragement is something that can come from learning any new challenging thing. As more and more people take to the dirt, we think it’s important to talk about how to overcome the mental block we sometimes experience from “failing” or not advancing as quickly as you think you should. Take it from me, if I had a $1 for every time I failed hard while riding (or in life), I’d be richer than Oprah.

Manage Expectations

Street to Dirt? Should be Easy Right?! Not exactly. For the majority of riders, going from street to dirt may seem like a breeze but we promise its an entirely different animal. It doesn’t matter if you’ve been riding street for over 10 years, the dirt will humble even the most skilled person (and that is ok!). These machines do not acknowledge ego so if you go into it with a level you think you should be at but simply are not there yet, you are going to have a really hard time focusing on learning or potentially getting injured.

  • Slow down (mentally and physically)

  • Invest in quality gear that fits

  • Accept that you are starting as a new rider all over again

  • Take the time to learn trail etiquette

  • Stick to open spaces and green trails then work your way up

  • Don’t give up

Practice Makes Perfect

You won’t become a better rider without putting in the seat time. Make the effort to add a few ride days with pals who are a bit more experienced on your ical and enjoy the camaraderie that follows. The feedback, cheerleading, and advice you’ll get while on the trail from your buds is the best . Whatever you do, don’t give up. No friends yet? Well damn… come to Babes in the Dirt 5 and meet some :)

Take Lessons | Ask Questions | Watch YouTube Videos

There are so many incredible classes you can take to become a better rider. Google your area to see what is close to you, you might be surprised. Nothing in your area? There is a world of YouTube videos on technique that you can watch and apply on your own.

Some of our favorite classes are taught by:

Babes in the Dirt

Iron Woman | Elizabeth Karcz and the Baja 1000

We caught up with Iron Woman Liz Karcz who is fresh of racing the Baja 1000 in the Ironman class. Yes, that it 800+ miles through the desert in 2 days solo. There is so much that goes in to getting mentally, physically and mechanically ready for a monumental feat such as this. Liz is the second woman in history to complete the Ironman class and finish! Read on to hear about her journey to the finish line.

babes in the dirt
babes in the dirt

Lets start by having you tell us a little about yourself:

Name: Liz Karcz

Where do you live? Albuquerque, NM

Day Job? more like “night job” (I work nightshift) but Trauma/Surgical/Burn/Open Heart ICU Nurse

How long have you been riding? 5 years

What bike do you ride? a 2009 Honda 450X and a 2013 KTM 300 XC  

How did you first get in to riding dirtbikes? My ex’s family was big into dirtbikes. While living in the Tahoe area I really got into mountain biking, and it seemed like the perfect next hobby!

What type of riding do you normally love to do? Desert, but I love some good mountain riding as well 

Tell us about the Baja 1000 and what inspired you to want to do it?

Well, once I got the OK from Mark (Winkleman) to attempt to be the first woman to solo the entire SCORE International series, I started with the San Felipe 250 and progressively moved onto the next event. After finishing the first 3, the Baja 1000 would be the grand finale, so there was no turning back at that point.

The Iron(Wo)Man class is pretty intense, break down what that is all about and how it challenges you as a rider.  

To Ironman a race means you race the entirety of the event on your own. Events as long as these are often done as a team, with each rider focusing on a specific section and giving it their all for a certain distance. There are a definitely a few challenges when committing to the entire distance. For one, you need to know how to pace yourself so that you don’t fatigue out. You need to take calculated risks (more so than a team racer) because if something happens to you, that’s it…you don’t have a backup rider.  You also need to be very mindful of your nutrition and hydration, refueling your body well enough to be able to handle hundreds of miles and hours of exertion at a time. And of course, you need to be both physically and mentally strong. Baja is a beautiful, but brutal place… easily one of the most challenging places on earth to race, and you need to be prepared for whatever she might throw your way.

What bike prep did you need in order to get ready? Any specific modifications? 

Having a Honda 450X to work with was a great foundation for a race bike in itself; they’re proven to withstand a variety of elements and be very reliable down in Baja.  To get Juanita more race ready (yes, my bike’s name is Juanita) my mechanic Greg jazzed her up with the following:  threw in an R camshaft when rebuilding the motor, gold valves from Race Tech for the suspension, Scotts Performance Products stabilizer, Baja Designs lighting (Baja Designs also did a rewind on my stator at the beginning of the season), and converted the gas tank to an IMS dry-break set up. My wheels were built with Warp 9 Racing rims/spokes, Moose steel sprockets, KENDA tires (Washougal for the front, Parker for the rear), and SRT bib mousses. And of course, the best graphics out there to make her pretty were designed & produced by my friend Matt at REV Designs.

babes in the dirt

What kind of training did you go through to get in shape for the Baja 1000?

I’m a pretty active person at baseline, so my training regimen was not far off from my routine. I continued to cross train with mountain biking and road cycling, plus quite a bit of time at the gym doing strength training and cardio  (weights, tire flips, rowing, swimming). To improve conditioning I would try to head up to the crest [Sandia Crest, elevation 10,679ft] every so often and run, and even road cycling up to the crest from the base was a good push (elevation gain of ~3600+ ft in 20ish miles). I usually eat pretty healthy, so didn’t follow any specific nutrition plan, but did incorporate additional supplements like amino acids to help with endurance….and minimizing my ‘adult beverage’ intake helped stay on track.  

babes in the dirt

Tell us about the ride, any mishaps? How was the terrain? Any particularly challenging sections? 

The longest one I’ve been on, that’s for sure! I had no rear brake for the last 50 miles or so (after a tip over onto a rock), but overall no major mishaps! Greg built me an incredible bike. She may have a few battle wounds, but my chase crew did an excellent job servicing the bike throughout the race to keep it running great (I think we did a total of 6 air filter changes, frequent oil checks and topped off as needed throughout the day, and fresh wheels at mile 480). The terrain, variable.  Some fast & flowy sections, lots of whoops, lots of rocks, and lots (and lots) of silt.  The most challenging was everything through Catavina, mostly because of how bad the silt got. The race unfortunately ended for a lot of people between 380-535; stuck vehicles, blown motors, it was a nightmare.

How was your mental state during the race? Were you super exhausted? While you were riding did you ever ask yourself what you were doing or have any doubts that you could finish etc

I was doing pretty well until about 24 hours in. After battling the gnarly terrain between 380-535 for 10 hours straight, sleep deprivation and physical exhaustion was catching up to me and I started to get delirious. I would start zoning out and dozing off riding my bike, and my mind would play tricks with me: was I still on course? Is this the wash I’m supposed to be in? Did I miss a marker? I was tired and sore, and everything looks so different at night. I knew the sun would be up soon and the homestretch was near, so I would force myself to stand as much as I could, and just start singing to myself…anything  to keep my mind active.

I never doubted myself that I could finish, but I did start to get worried that I was going to time out. In the last 50 miles I tipped over the bike on a hill climb (it was just getting so hard to hold on & my form was getting sloppy) and got pinned between my bike and a rock. My bike felt like it weighed over 500lbs at this point, I tried to wiggle myself out but it was hard. I started crying ,cussing, staring at my STELLA watching the time go by. I felt so helpless and trapped. Then I heard a car coming and realized I had no choice but to get myself up, that I didn’t come this far to time out.  I dug down and found whatever ounces of energy I had left to give that bike one last push. I got it up, and kept moving.

Did you feel prepared or un prepared once you started the race?  

I could have used a better night’s sleep, but otherwise, I was as ready as I was going to be. Greg (Sceiford, my mechanic) worked hard with me all year to prepare me from a bike-troubleshooting standpoint, and I had the best chase crew with the right logistics, so I knew I was in good hands and could just focus on riding the bike.

How was the navigation? Did ya get lost at all?

The navigation is pretty easy to follow if you have a GPS. There were still a fair amount of markers left by race day in most sections, but once you got to the coast, they were slim. Unfortunately, after weeks of pre-running it’s just bound to happen so you need to be ready for that. I don’t know how anyone could race without a GPS, truthfully. There is just too much potential for error and to get lost out there.

Was there any other ladies riding that you came across?

When I was riding I was so focused on my own race I honestly didn’t know who may or may not be around me, unless it was at a pit or check point. However (don’t quote me on this) I don’t believe there was any other females racing on a dirtbike or quad…I could be wrong, hard to tell with helmets on; and I don’t believe I was ever caught by any of my  gal pals that race in the other classes (UTV, Truck, Car, etc)…I could also be wrong with this, in the dark it’s sometimes hard to tell, and most of the last 10 hours was a blur as far as my surroundings.

babes in the dirt

Tell us about some of the people you met.

Throughout the season I have been so fortunate to make so many awesome friends! Of course it’s been a blast getting to know some of the other ladies like Sara Price, Ericka Sacs, Kristen Matlock, Julie Boyer, Diane Giannelli, Baja Nikki (to name a few). So many other amazing racers too: Cameron Steele, Steve Hengeveld, Ricky Johnson. But one of the coolest things was having Jimmy Sones come down to help chase me during the 1000. He’s a legend, and so knowledgeable, to have him be a part of my race was really cool.  

Favorite part?

Running into all my friends I’ve made throughout the year, whether it’s locals or people from back in the States. There is nothing like moto family, and even more so, there is nothing like Baja family…it’s just such an incredible place to be experiencing together, no one ever goes home without stories.

Least favorite part?

 I would say it’s a tie between the silt, and having to share a race course with the trucks/cars/UTVs.

Describe your feeling when you crossed the finish line? What was that like?

Relief.  I was so happy to have made it back, me ok, the bike’s ok…. to see my family and friends again, and knowing I was going to get to go back home to my dogs!! The actual reality of what I accomplished would take a few days to sink in, which of course makes me ecstatic…sometimes I still can’t believe it’s over and I did it.  

Would you do it again?

Hard to say. It’s not something that is realistic for me to try to go back to for 2019, but if the right opportunity presented itself in the future, maybe? There are also other events that would challenge me in similar ways which would be fun to try, so I guess we’ll see where the wind blows.  

If you did, would you change anything about how you did it?

I would have definitely started peeing on myself sooner! For the longest time, I was super skeptical about resorting to that as a time-saving strategy…but had I not done it at the 1000, I would have timed out. It makes me wonder how much faster my times would have been at the others if I didn’t overthink it and just did it.

babes in the dirt

Any suggestions for ladies who might be interested in going for it next year?

I would say definitely do your homework. Before doing any kind of racing in Baja, I think it would be very beneficial to get down there for a fun ride beforehand, or link up with another team and go pre-run with them… to get a feel for the terrain around the peninsula, see what roads go where, what towns are where, etc. What a lot of people don’t realize (I know I didn’t until I came down to prerun during the 2017 Baja 500) is just how much the layout of the land plays a factor in planning logistics, whether you are racing on a team or solo.  Not everywhere on the course is accessible by vehicles, not every town has a gas station, not everywhere is ideal for a rider change (if racing as a team), cell phones don’t work everywhere and medical help can be hours away…the list goes on. Does that mean that someone who has never been to Baja can’t successfully race there? No, I’m sure it’s been pulled off before. However, the more you plan and the better you prepare, the better of an experience it will be. Racing down in Baja is not to be taken lightly. It is an amazing thing, but it is also a dangerous thing. You need to know what you are up against, have back-up plans, and then have back-up plans for your back-up plans. That being said, with the right amount of organization and the right people in your corner, it can be a beautiful, once-in-a lifetime experience; commit to it, put in the time and work, and anything is possible.

babes in the dirt